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Showing posts from 2016

The Elms Hotel

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Do you believe in curses? At one time, it may have crossed the minds of those living in Excelsior Springs, Missouri. The Elms Hotel and Spa burned down twice. Thankfully, no one was hurt in either fire. But lets start at the beginning.

The Elms didn't become a twinkle in someone's eye until after a local farmer used the healing mineral waters to cure his daughter's incurable tuberculosis in 1880. Word of her miraculous recovery spread about the country and people began to descend on the location in hopes of curing their own ailments. A pastor named John Van Buren Flack and a landowner named Anthony Wyman saw it's business potential, forming Excelsior Springs.

Excelsior Springs Company was created to bring the town pavilions, parks and The Elms Hotel. The hotel opened in 1888 and guests enjoyed the mineral water baths, gardens and luxurious parties and balls. Ten years after it open its doors, the first fire burned the wooden structure to the ground on May 9, 1898. Anot…

Remembering 9/11

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The White Lady of Frio River

There is a lot of fear that surrounds ghosts, particularly those who had a violent life. It's always good to come across one who is good and gentle in nature. The life of Maria Juarez may have ended tragically but she spends her afterlife as a protector of children in Uvalde County, Texas.

All Maria wanted was to marry and start a family of her own. She was very close to her older sister. Even cared for her children. However, her constant presence in her sister's life came with a price. Her sister's husband Gregorio fell in love with Maria. She being the good honest person that she was refused him. Unfortunately, he did not want to take no for an answer.

The day came that Maria almost received her wish. She met a man name Anselmo. They fell in love and were about to marry. Upon learning of this news, Gregorio became enraged. If he couldn't have her, he wasn't going to let anyone else either. Maria went to meet Anselmo but came face-to-face with Gregorio instead. He…

New London Ledge Lighthouse

New London Ledge Lighthouse was built in 1909 on top of a concrete pier. This Groton, Connecticut lighthouse has been tended to by keepers until 1939 when the U.S. Coast Guard took over. Then, it was converted to automated in 1987. Of course, that is not why it is being mentioned here. It's alleged haunted status began with one lighthouse keeper.

This man's name was supposedly John Randolph. Living in a lighthouse in the 1920s or '30s can be a lonely existence. Randolph's wife found ways to maintain her sanity by flirting with local fishermen and sailors until that wasn't even enough. One day, when he went ashore for supplies, his wife ran off with the Block Island Ferry boat captain and never returned. When Randolph discovered his wife had left him, he slit his throat and fell from the 65 ft tower. His body was never found. A heartbreaking story, right? Unfortunately, there isn't any documentation John Randolph even existed much less killed himself.

However, a…

Los Feliz Mansion

Designed by architect Harry E Weiner, this 1925 Los Angeles mansion was once owned by German silent film director/producer Frederic Zelnik. While Los Feliz Mansion may look like a thing of beauty, it bared witness to a tragedy.

On December 6, 1959, a Dr. Harold Perelson struck his wife Lillian with a ball-peen hammer, leaving her to drown in her own blood. Then proceeded to his teenage daughter Judye's room. He struck her in the head as well but in such a way she wasn't seriously injured. She managed to flee and call for help. Her two siblings were left unharmed. By the time police and an ambulance arrived, Dr Perelson was dead, committing suicide after swallowing pills. Supposedly, he had attempted suicide several times before but was stopped by his wife. The reason behind the murder-suicide is unknown. However, some believe it may have been because of financial troubles.

Since then, the house has changed owners a few times, but no one has really lived in it. Well...until now…

Gaither Plantation

Gaither Plantation was once a cotton plantation ran by Cecilia and William Hubert Gaither in the 1850s. The property extended several thousand acres but now consists of only a few hundred, including the original home, several outbuildings and a relocated historic church built in 1822.

Cecilia and W. H. had several children. W.H. died in 1890 after the house was deeded to Cecilia. Their daughter Clara died at the age of 9. Her and her father are both buried in a family cemetery on the grounds. Cecilia was forced to sell the plantation in 1921 when she was unable to pay the $28 in taxes she owed. During the Civil War, it’s rumored that Cecilia hid Confederate soldiers at the plantation up a secret stairway so the Yankees wouldn't burn her house. Thankfully, they didn't discover the soldiers, but did take some livestock she had hidden away.

Several spirits are said to roam the property. A female is often seen. Sensitives state her name to be “Ceely”. One paranormal group discover…

Hanoverville Roadhouse

The main colonial-style structure was built around 1825. The rich soil and abundance of rain in this area of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania made it the perfect spot for a farmhouse. However, perhaps the location made it perfect for a lot of things. In 1837, the building was turned in to a hotel, general store, and post office complete with a stagecoach stop. The business remained the same through the Civil War.

Despite changing hands, the bar always remained open. When the 1930s rolled in, it transformed in to a restaurant, bar and hunting lodge. It gained a reputation as a family establishment during the '40s and '50s. A decade or so later, the building went through some construction. First floor walls were removed. A stage and two bars were built. Canned Heat from Woodstock fame and Tiny Tim both performed at the Roadhouse.

The Hanoverville Roadhouse may be known as a great place to take the family, but is it haunted? Many believe so. Most of the activity centers around a little bo…

Tevennec Lighthouse

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Would you spend two months in a lighthouse with a reputation of driving people insane? One man took on the challenge to raise awareness for Tevennec Lighthouse in hopes of restoring it but after one failed attempt, not sure if he has completed his task much less kept his sanity while doing it.

Tevennec Lighthouse is located in the Raz de Sein strait off the coast of Brittany, France. It was built in 1871 and first lit in 1875. The first keeper Henri Guezennec couldn't handle the long periods of time alone and succumbed to madness. He claimed he heard voices shouting to him to leave. Considering the Tevennec had a dark reputation prior to the lighthouse being built, perhaps he did hear voices.

Tevennec was a place where the dead was taken, well according to folklore that is. It was also the place where the mythical Ankou, the Breton grim reaper, supposedly resided. Such stories were fueled by the fact that if you had a boat with no engine, you would be automatically taken to Tevenn…

Reader Submission: Paranormal Activity at the Pharmacy Museum

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As a ghost tour guide in New Orleans, you tend to get repeat questions:
Are we going inside any haunted locations? Unfortunately, no, not unless you have a cool million or so to put down on a historic residence in the French Quarter.
Do you believe in ghosts? The answer to that is yes. I’m fully aware that many guides out there are all-in-out skeptics, but I’m not one of them.
Which leads us to . . .
Will we experience any paranormal activity on our tour tonight? This one’s the kicker, mainly because all guides only wish that we could make ghostly phenomena perform on demand. How much easier would that be for tour companies or paranormal investigators? So much easier.
So that question of whether or not guests will experience ghostly phenomena while on a tour? Highly unlikely—until, that is, it actually happens.
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The first time occurred last August. I remember only because it was deathly hot outside and I was, unfortunately, sweating profusely. That night, only two sisters had jo…

Ghost Hollow

An Elm tree once stood along the Cimarron River in Ripley, Oklahoma believed to be cursed. In the 1800s, this tree served as the ideal spot for hangings. Legend goes in 1887 an innocent man was strung up on that Elm. The next day, all the bark mysteriously fell off of it. When the light of the moon shined on this bare tree, it glowed an eerie white color. Some say you could even see a body hanging from it.

Another story states, three horse thieves were mysteriously hung from the tree, but was not the first death this tree has seen. Supposedly, an "Indian princess" on the site of the tree. Her crime? Falling in love with a white man. She was 17 and wanted to run away to marry him but her father intervened. He attempted to shoot her suitor but instead killed his daughter. Ever since then, the tree has been cursed, demanding a life every 17 years. Other deaths associated with the tree includes a gambler who was caught cheating, two bodies were found there in the early 1900s and…

Goose River Bridge

Looking for a good drink? You may give Goose River Bridge a try. Now, I'm sure you're asking yourself "Why go to a bridge for a beer?". A very hospitable ghost has been known to offer mugs of ale to visitors.

Goose River Bridge is located in what is now known as Rockport, Maine. During the American Revolution, a man named William Richardson played his part in aiding an American privateer who stole a British ship by guiding him to safety and away from the British. Feeling proud of playing his part in winning the war, Richardson decided to throw the biggest party in 1783.

He drank heavily throughout the night and made certain everyone else did as well. Richardson made the rounds, making sure everyone's glass was always filled. Sometime during the night, he wandered off from the party and continued to entertain the good people of Goose River with his singing and dancing. It would be a mistake he would not live to regret. The road led to the bridge where he came acro…

Suicide Bridge

Many of you know of the Aokigahara Forest in Japan as the location to take their lives. Here in the United States, we have The Colorado Street Bridge a.k.a. The Suicide Bridge in Pasadena, California. Since being built in 1913, over 150 people have relinquished their lives from this structure. The bridge spans 1,486 feet over the Arroyo Seco and sits on the original Route 66. It's known for its distinctive Beaux Arts arches, light standards, artistic supports and railings.

A suicide barrier was added to reduce the number of suicides. After the Loma Prieta earthquake in Northern California of 1989, the bridge was declared a seismic hazard and closed to traffic but reopened in 1993 after a substantial retrofit. The Suicide Bridge was thrown in to the spotlight thanks to film, music, and TV. It's first onscreen appearance was in Charlie Chaplin's The Tramp and was later used in Alias, Seabiscuit, NCIS and The Mentalist. A monument with so much history makes one wonder, why …

Sorry For the Delay

I know Ghost Stories has been lacking new posts as of late. I have no excuse other than the lack of time. I'm in the process of giving the blog some much needed TLC. I'm hoping to have some new stories posted soon. Thanks for your patience.


Andrea